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Auteur Sujet: deux livres qui proposent des topos sur les techniques primitives  (Lu 5215 fois)

06 décembre 2008 à 17:55:07
Lu 5215 fois

3Dayspack


Bonjour,

voici l'adresse d'un site www.primitive.org qui propose deux livres avec des topos pour réaliser des outils, expliquer des techniques primitives. Ces livres coutent 25$ chacun et peuvent être commandés sur le site ( vous pouvez aussi les trouver sur amazon). je les ai acheté, ils sont très biens, les topos sont clairs et j'ai même testé certains topos sans problème. Ils sont cependant en noir et blanc et en anglais mais avec un bon dico pour les termes techniques et de la patience ils restent très abordables.

bonne lecture

voici les rubriques des deux livres pour vous faire une première idée:


The Society of Primitive Technology

Primitive Technology: A Book of Earth Skills
The best from the pages of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology

Primitive Technology includes reprints of valuable articles from back issues of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology that are no longer in print, plus many new and descriptive additions that have never been seen before.

Due to the high cost of reproduction for single issues of the Bulletin and the demand from new members for access to this valuable information, the Society of Primitive Technology has produced this special edition of Primitive Technology. This book contains the outstanding writing, photo essays and charts that are found in each issue of the Bulletin. Plus the Editor has added many new sidebars and tidbits of information never before published by the Society. It's a true collector's item for every member of the Society of Primitive Technology. 1999. 248 Pages. Cost $25.

 
Forward

SECTION I: PRIMITIVE TECHNOLOGY
What is Experimental Archaeology by Errett Callahan
The Society of Primitive Technology and Experimental Archaeology by David Wescott
Sheltered in Prehistory by Steve Watts
Why Build Traditional Houses Today by John White
North American House Reconstruction Projects
More Than Just A Shelter by Susan Eirich-Dehn
Caddo House Reconstruction by Scooter Cheatham

SECTION II: FIRE-WHERE WE BEGIN
The Miracle of Fire by Friction by Dick Baugh
Fire by Norm Kidder
Understanding Wood Fire by Mors Kochanski
The Hand-drill and Other Fires by David Wescott
Tips for Hand-drill Fire Makers by Paul Schweighardt
The Goysich Hand-drill by Jim Allen
Experiments With the Hand-drill by Evard Gibby
Pump-drill Fires by Anthony Follari
Tinder Bundle Construction by Charles Worsham
Polypore Fungi Fire Extenders by R. Allen Mounier
Where There is No Tinder by E. J. Pratt
Primitive Match by David Holladay

SECTION III: BONE, STONE & WOOD- BASIC ELEMENTS
First Tools by David Wescott
Bone Working Basics by Steve Watts
Bone Splitting Tips by Steve Watts
An Exercise with Bone by David Holladay
Split Rib-Bone Knives by Steve Watts
From The Leg Of The Deer by Roy H. Brown
Mat Needles by Chris Morasky
Making a Reduced Antler Flaker by Steven Edholm
Antler Billet by Chas. Spear
Selecting Bone Working Materials by David Wescott
Knife Hafting Ideas by Chas. Spear
Stages of Manufacture by Errett Callahan
Stone Tool Basics by Steve Watts
Principles of Uniformity by David Wescott
Experimental Reproduction of Prehistoric Sickles by Manuel Luque Cortina & Javier Baena Preysler
Knapping Illustrated by Chas. Spear
Hands-Free Vice & Primitive Switch Blade Knife by George Stewart
Basketmaker Knife by David Holladay
Drilling Stone by Larry Kinsella
Celts and Axes by Errett Callahan
Personal Notes on Celt Use by Larry Kinsella
Manufacture of Ground Stone Axes by Paul Hellweg
Greenstone Woodworking Tools by Scott Silsby
Knapping Tools by Steve Watts
Peek Into The Past by Steve Allely
Functional Motions by Errett Callahan
Wood Working Basics by David Wescott
Shaving Horse by Douglas Macleod
The Roycroft Pack Frame by Dick Baugh
Manufacture of Thrusting Spears by Steve Watts
Bullroarers by Tom Hackett
Carving Green Wood by Gregg Blomberg
A Hafted Adze by George Price
SECTION IV: FIBERS- HOLDING THE WORLD TOGETHER
Gathering and Preparing Plant Fibers by David Wescott
Rediscovering Flax by Evard Gibby
Agave Fibers by Michael Ryan
Agave Fiber Preparation by David Holladay
Retting Basswood Bark by Scott Silsby
Cordage by Steven Edholm and Tamara Wilder
Tumplines, Carrying Bags and Belts by Alice Tulloch
Netting Notes by Steve Watts
Pomo Netting by Craig Bates
Dogbane Net by Jeff Gottlieb
Swamp Dancers by Doug Elliott
Cattail Visor by Star Compost
Cattail Dolls by Mors Kochanski
The Versatile Tule by Jim Riggs
Tule Ethnobotany by Norm Kidder
Split Willow Sculpture by Thomas J. Elpel
Plaited Yucca Sandals by Paul Campbell
Make Your Own Hide Glue by Jim Riggs
Mummy Varnish, Spruce Gum and Other Sticky Stuff by Scott Silsby
Making Pitch Sticks by Evard Gibby
A Word on Pitch by Errett Callahan
About Animal Glues by Errett Callahan

SECTION V: PROJECTILES-POWER FROM THE HUMAN HAND
Thong-Thrown Arrows and Spears by Tim Baker
Throwing Darts With the Baton de Commandement by Paul Comstock
Atlatls: Throwing for Distance by Craig Ratzat
Primitive Hunting Equipment by Scooter Cheatham
Reconstructing A Generic Basketmaker Atlatl by David Wescott
Primitive Hunting Equipment by Scooter Cheatham
Throwing Atlatl Darts
Throwing Stick Patterns
Hand-Thrown Projectiles
Throwing Sticks by Scooter Cheatham
The Non-Returning Boomerang by Errett Callahan
Using Natural Wood Elbows by Ray Rieser
Tuning and Throwing by Robert Foresi
Making Throw Sticks Behave by Norm Kern

SECTION VI: ART & MUSIC- DISCIPLINE AND MEANING
The Music of Prehistory by Laurence Libin
Paint with Pride by Doug Land
ABO Art Supplies by Steve Watts
Aboriginal Airbrush by Wylie Woods
Musical Glossary by David Wescott
Bone Flutes by Manuel Lizaralde
Ziarian Rattle by Robert Withrow
Musical Instruments of Central California by Norm Kidder
Removing the Hooves of Deer by Tamara Wilder
Deer Hoof Rattles by Norm Kidder
Gadgets & Geegaws by David Wescott

SECTION VII: APPENDIX
The Hazards of Roadkill by Alice Tulloch
Ethics For Modern "Primitives" by Alice Tulloch

-Please Scroll Down The Page for Ordering Information.-


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now Available!
Primitive Technology II: Ancestral Skills
More great articles compiled from the pages of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology

Primitive Technology II: Ancestral Skills includes more reprints of valuable articles from back issues of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology that are no longer in print, plus many new and descriptive additions that have never been seen before.

Due to the high cost of reproduction for single issues of the Bulletin and the demand from new members for access to this valuable information, the Society of Primitive Technology has produced this second edition of Primitive Technology. This book contains the outstanding writing, photo essays and charts that are found in each issue of the Bulletin. Plus the Editor has added many new sidebars and tidbits of information never before published by the Society. It's a true collector's item for every member of the Society of Primitive Technology. 2001. 248 Pages. Cost $25.


SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION: SEARCHING THE PAST
When the People Gather by David Wescott
Collective Vision and Our Evolving Culture by Catherine St. John
Metaphors for Living: Questing for Insights by Thomas J. Elpel
Primitive Technology and The "New" Archaeology by Maria-Louise Sidoroff
Field Archaeology by John White
Random Thoughts on Tradition vs. Technology by Norm Kidder
Artifacts & Ethics by Thomas J. Elpel
Ethics & Collecting: A Question by David Wescott

SECTION 2: FOOD SOURCES: EATING TO LIVE
Slim, Trim and Paleo-Indian: Why Our Diets Are Killing Us by Vaughn Bryant Jr.
Wild Plant Economics by Thomas J. Elpel
Roast of the Century: Mescal and the Mescalero Apache by Mark Rosacker with Susan Burneson
Burning and Scraping: A Southeastern Indian Corn Mortar by Steve Watts
Aboriginal Cookery by Alice Ross
Various Food Gathering Methods by Charles Spear
Trapping: Take A New/Old Look by Matt McMahon
"Rocking On" With The Paiute Deadfall: Its Prehistory, Construction and Use by Jim Riggs
Sampson Post Deadfall by James Andal
Reflections On a Rabbit Stick by Jim Allen
Southeastern Indian Rabbit Sticks by Steve Watts
More on Rabbitsticks by David Wescott

SECTION 3: CONTAINERS: HOLDING IT ALL TOGETHER
Introduction to Ceramic Replication by Maria Louise Sidoroff
Primitive Pottery Firing: Lenape Indian Village by Maria-Louise Sidoroff
A Method For Firing Primitive Pottery by Evard Gibby
Various Containers by David Wescott
How To Cook In Primitive Pottery by Errett Callahan
An Introduction to NW Coast Woodwork by Gregg Blomberg
Southeastern Indian Gourd Buckets by Steve Watts
Barking Up the Right Tree... Construction of The Juniper Bark Berry Basket by Jim Riggs
Make A Mountain Bark Basket by Doug Elliott
Variation On A Theme: Aspen Bark Containers by David Wescott
Bark Canteens: Carrying Water Primitively by Anthony Follari
The Uses of Birch Bark by Jim Miller
Pinch Pots by Charles Spear

SECTION 4: PROJECTILES: BOWS & ARROWS
Your First Primitive Bow by Tim Baker
Sticks and Stones Will Make My Bow by Barry Keegan
Wood Under Stress by Hari Heath
The Causes of Arrow Speed by Tim Baker
Southeastern Rivercane Arrow Notes by Steve Watts
A Note On Primitive Bow Making: Or The Secrets of Sinew Revealed by Dick Baugh
Archery In The Arctic: Part I by Errett Callahan
Artcic Archery: Part II by Errett Callahan
Arctic Archery: Part II by Errett Callahan
On The Cutting Edge: Stone Tool Bow Making by Bart Blankenship
The 30 Minute Bow by Jim Allen

SECTION 5: BUCKSKIN: ENOUGH BRAINS TO TAN YOUR HIDE
Working Hides With Stone, Bone and Antler Tools by Steven Edholm
A Variety of Wood, Bone and Stone Awls by Steve Watts
Buckskin Babblings Edited by Alice Tulloch
Subcutaneous Stitch For Buckskin by Chris Morasky
Tan Your Hides With Nature's Tools by Jim Miller
Brains, Bones and Hot Springs: Native American Deerskin Dressing at the Time of Contact by Matt Richards

SECTION 6: TRANSPORTATION: MOVING ALONG
Primitive Travel Gear by Matt McMahon
Primitive Fiber Bundle Watercraft: A Materials Primer by Steve Watts
Tule Boats by Dick Baugh
The Scapular Saw: A Stone and Bone Age Project by Norm Kidder
Diegueno Rawhide Sandals by Paul Campbell
Ga-o-wo: Building An Iroquis Elm-Bark Canoe by Michael Kerwin
The Canoe Tree by D. R. Doerres
Mud and Fire: Tools of the Dugout Canoe Maker by Terry Powell
A Carved Boat From the Northwest Coast by Gregg Blomberg
Danish Neolithic Boat Project by Errett Callahan
The Ancient Coracle by Maria Louis Sidoroff
Yucca and Agave Fiber Sandals of Southern California by Paul Campbell
Light On The Subject of Cave Art by Maria-Louise Sidoroff
Conquering The Darkness: Primitive Lighting Methods by Benjamin Pressley

SECTION 7: BACK TO BASICS: TOOLS THROUGH TIME
The Lower Paleolithic by Steve Watts
On The Deceptive Simplicity of Lower Paleolithic Tools by John J. Shea
Paleo "Bashed" Tools: A Story by Chas. Spear
The Bipolar Technique: The Simplest Way To Make Stone Tools by Errett Callahan
Easy To Make "Pebble" Tools by Paul Hellweg
Bow-Drill Fire Making Equipment by Steve Watts
Simple Comparative Tests Between Oldowan, Abbevillian and Acheulian Technology Edited by Errett Callahan
A Quick Guide to Classic Old World Paleolithic Chopper and Handaxe Forms by Steve Watts
Handaxmanship by Steve Watts
Hand-Drill Fire Making by Steven Edholm
More On Fire by Friction by Evard Gibby
Ready To Use Stone Containers by Jeff Gottlieb
Bark Cordage Fishing Line by Steve Watts
Making Cordage by Hand by Norm Kidder
Some Shelter Concepts by Mors Kochanski


On ne peut bien réagir à une situation que lorsqu'on s'y est préparé et entraîné.

La première impression est toujours la bonne, écoutez votre instinct, il saura vous protéger.

09 décembre 2008 à 02:53:07
Réponse #1

stefalive


Le monde est un livre, et ceux qui ne voyagent pas n’en lisent qu’une page...

11 décembre 2008 à 16:20:47
Réponse #2

ERECTUS


Quand sa route est dure, le dur poursuit sa route

 


Keep in mind

Bienveillance, n.f. : disposition affective d'une volonté qui vise le bien et le bonheur d'autrui. (Wikipedia).

« [...] ce qui devrait toujours nous éveiller quant à l'obligation de s'adresser à l'autre comme l'on voudrait que l'on s'adresse à nous :
avec bienveillance, curiosité et un appétit pour le dialogue et la réflexion que l'interlocuteur peut susciter. »


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